Book Review: Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

breakfast_at_tiffanysWhat’s it about?

It’s New York in the 1940s, where the martinis flow from cocktail hour till breakfast at Tiffany’s. And nice girls don’t, except, of course, for Holly Golightly: glittering socialite traveller, generally upwards, sometimes sideways and once in a while – down. Pursued by to Salvatore ‘Sally’ Tomato, the Mafia sugar-daddy doing life in Sing Sing and ‘Rusty’ Trawler, the blue-chinned, cuff-shooting millionaire man about women about town, Holly is a fragile eyeful of tawny hair and turned-up nose, a heart-breaker, a perplexer, a traveller, a tease. She is irrepressibly ‘top banana in the shock deparment’, and one of the shining flowers of American fiction.

My thoughts

Breakfast at Tiffany’s is one of my all time favourite movies; full of glamour and quirkiness and so I’d put off reading the book for a long time. There’s always that sense of anticpation of disappointment and of how different it will be, which I guess can work both ways.

I hadn’t realised that it’s actually a short story at only 87 pages so  I actually read it in 2 sittings. The book is quite different to the movie; the essence of the book is there and the general plot is the same but is often planned out in different scenes.

Book Holly is certainly a darker character and not necessarily a nice one; she comes across as an IT girl and is definitely a goldigger making her living by visits to the powder room ahem!! and visiting a mobster in prison.

“Leave it to me: I’m always top banana in the shock department.”

However, movie Holly is somewhat flaky and likes to talk in riddles, which initially comes across as scatty nonsense although look deeper and there is some kind of sense there. Neither version of Holly seem to care about they treat other people, in essence using older unattractive men for money; the exception being Fred her brother, he’s the one person I think she really cares about.

“You’re wrong. She is a phony. But on the other hand you’re right. She isn’t a phony because she’s a real phony. She believes all this crap she believes. You can’t talk her out of it.”

The book ending is quite different to the movie and I actually preferred the romantic movie ending. This is supposed to be a love story but there isn’t much romantisicm at all.

Overall, I was a little disappointed by the book and enjoyed the cinematic experience of the story a lot more. For me , this is one instance where I prefer the movie to the book. However, if you’ve not read the book or seen the movie and it interests you, go straight to the movie. If I’d have read the book first I wouldn’t have got to the movie.

This version contains 3 other short stories: House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory – I didn’t read these this time but may come back to them at another time.

Get the book Paperback

Discover more about the author Truman Capote

 

WWW Wednesday (April 8th)

This weekly meme is hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words. It’s open to all to participate. Why not join in and let us know what you’re reading this week…

WWW Wednesday

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…

• What are you currently reading?

• What did you recently finish reading?

• What do you think you’ll read next?

What are you currently reading?

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell Eleanor & Park

YA isn’t my preferred genre but I won this signed copy in a Twitter comp so thought I’d give it a go; albeit a tad sceptical that I’d enjoy it. Well I got a third way through the book in one sitting; partly because it’s very easy to get on with and secondly because I got wrapped in their story – more so Eleanor’s! 🙂

The blurb

Eleanor is the new girl in town, and she’s never felt more alone. All mismatched clothes, mad red hair and chaotic home life, she couldn’t stick out more if she tried.

Then she takes the seat on the bus next to Park. Quiet, careful and – in Eleanor’s eyes – impossibly cool, Park’s worked out that flying under the radar is the best way to get by.

Slowly, steadily, through late-night conversations and an ever-growing stack of mix tapes, Eleanor and Park fall in love. They fall in love the way you do the first time, when you’re 16, and you have nothing and everything to lose.

What did you recently finish reading?

breakfast_at_tiffanysBreakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

This is one of all my time favourite movies so reading the book after I’ve seen the movie so many times was going to be a tough challenge. I hadn’t realised it was only a short story so at 87 pages it’s a quick read; I just didn’t love it as much as the movie. Review to follow shortly.

The blurb

It’s New York in the 1940s, where the martinis flow from cocktail hour till breakfast at Tiffany’s. And nice girls don’t, except, of course, for Holly Golightly: glittering socialite traveller, generally upwards, sometimes sideways and once in a while – down. Pursued by to Salvatore ‘Sally’ Tomato, the Mafia sugar-daddy doing life in Sing Sing and ‘Rusty’ Trawler, the blue-chinned, cuff-shooting millionaire man about women about town, Holly is a fragile eyeful of tawny hair and turned-up nose, a heart-breaker, a perplexer, a traveller, a tease. She is irrepressibly ‘top banana in the shock deparment’, and one of the shining flowers of American fiction.

What do you think you’ll read next?

rebeccaRebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

This month is about taking part in the Paperback Month reading challenge so I tried to pick books that I’ve been meaning to read for a long time – this is one of those. I just hope I’ll be able to get through the language.

The blurb

The novel begins in Monte Carlo, where our heroine is swept off her feet by the dashing widower Maxim de Winter and his sudden proposal of marriage. Orphaned and working as a lady’s maid, she can barely believe her luck. It is only when they arrive at his massive country estate that she realizes how large a shadow his late wife will cast over their lives–presenting her with a lingering evil that threatens to destroy their marriage from beyond the grave.

What’s on your reading list this week?